Potential city hall annex may be demolished
by Nick Rappley | Patterson Irrigator
Jun 27, 2013 | 2329 views | 0 0 comments | 70 70 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The building at 21 and 25 Del Puerto Ave. purchased by the city of Patterson to be the City Hall Annex is being determined by city staff and contractors to be too costly to save. The city originally bought the building from Patterson Property Manager John Ramos last year for $650,000.--Irrigator Photo by Nick Rappley
The building at 21 and 25 Del Puerto Ave. purchased by the city of Patterson to be the City Hall Annex is being determined by city staff and contractors to be too costly to save. The city originally bought the building from Patterson Property Manager John Ramos last year for $650,000.--Irrigator Photo by Nick Rappley
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A building that was bought by the City of Patterson last year to eventually serve as a home for the Patterson Township Historical Society, Patterson-Westley Chamber of Commerce and additional city offices may be demolished and rebuilt, costing taxpayers up to $2.5 million, including the original $650,000 for its purchase, depending on how the city council decides to act.

The building at 21 and 25 Del Puerto Ave. in Patterson may be destroyed and rebuilt, rather than be saved and retrofitted with seismic upgrades meant to stabilize it in case of an earthquake. In a May 23 records request, The Irrigator asked for all documents pertaining to the condition of the building. The Irrigator was informed that it would receive the records June 28. The item appeared on the June 18 city council agenda, however, it was tabled due to the length of that meeting to July 2.

A staff report from City Manger Rod Butler now recommends the city council demolish the buildings, direct staff to help existing businesses in the building relocate by the beginning of next year, find temporary homes for the Historical Society and Chamber of Commerce and direct staff to develop a plan to build a new annex. Butler was on vacation and unavailable for contact this week. Mayor Luis Molina said he could not comment on the matter before it was brought up before the council, other than to say that the council would pursue the most financially viable option.

The report states that a September 2012 report to the city council was given regarding the need for fire sprinklers, Americans with Disabilities Act upgrades and the need for further inspections. Escrow had closed on the building in August of 2012, according to the staff report by Butler.

After more investigations in September 2012, more deficiencies were found, including structural repairs that were needed to put the sprinklers in, asbestos and lead paint removal. The report also indicates that more repairs were needed for sufficient electrical service and heating and air conditioning.

Michael Crawford, a structural engineer out of El Dorado Hills, was also contracted and brought in to penetrate the walls of the building and test them for structural integrity, the report indicates. He called for a rebuild of the entire interior of the building to repair structural problems.

A second opinion was sought from Provost and Pritchard Consulting group, which conducted a second structural test. Provost’s report agrees with Crawford, according to Butler’s report.

Butler will be presenting three options to the city council July 2 to remedy the problems with the building.

One option would be considered a minimum repair that could cost over $100,000 and not address seismic problems with the building. City staff considers that option not financially viable in the long term, the report indicates.

Another option would be to tear the building down to the exterior walls only, and rebuilding it at a cost of more than $1.5 million, bringing a total cost of the project to more than $2 million.

A third option, recommended by Butler and his staff, would cost between $2.5 million and $5 million. It consists of demolishing and rebuilding the structure from scratch.

Butler’s report indicates community meetings could take place to develop a plan for the new building, as well.

Butler said the money for the project would be culled from a variety of sources including capital project reserves, money from the restructure of bond funding currently taking place in the Heartland Ranch, Walker Ranch and Patterson Garden’s facilities funding and loans.

Contact Nick Rappley at 892-6187, ext. 31 or nick@pattersonirrigator.com.

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